Critiques for Ashwin (18th Sep) Agnishatdal and Agnijaat

Soulbro

~These are my perspective notes from the September 2016 issue of Agnishatdal Ashwin~

~Science by Troy David Lloyd~to only imagine to be of another solar system and understand if there is a greater society than ours out there~nice prose~

~Only yourself by Wendell Brown~love is Universal and unconditional~if you take a narcisstic approach to love then it can never be real~very nice poem~

~Universal Love~Ngobesing Romanus~a great sensation that the heart feels this Universal love all over~nice poetry~

~Impressions~Lisa Ojanpera~truth and profound post~indeed a bit witty too~

~Aardvark Reflections~Carolyn Paige~it seems my mantra in seeking the truth is to always revert back to Psalma 118:8~take refuge in the Lord and trust no man~in doing so you will always know the truth~your heart tells you so about you~

~Binding the household~Swati Sarangi~home is always where the heart is~this is where love begins within~if we seek the truth with love and do find it within our heart then we know how much love, compassion and understanding we can take with us no matter where we go in life~

~Overall the ezine is still an interesting read~once again the talent is what makes this interesting as well~continue with success~thank you my Precious Flower for your kindest words about me as well~

Dom*Colucci
~soulbro*~

Troy David Loy

kestalus@verizon.net

https://www.amazon.com/author/troyloy

First, for Ashwin Agnijaat:

Rakhipurnima:
This was a fascinating piece, as though there are bonds of sibling-hood and friendship almost universally across cultures, this celebration is to my knowledge unique to Indian society, and I find it quite touching to say the least! Sadly, I know nothing of its like in the West.

Kaulinyapratha:
A good discussion of a custom that for centuries has put Bengali women in a very bad situation for the sake of deference to older men. The fact of serial grooms, hungry to enrich themselves with dowries paints a dark picture of human ethics, and darker still the outcome for brides who become widows at an early age.

Slyphones:
Hear, hear! I’m in agreement with this, that ‘smartphone’ is a misnomer, and ‘instrument for covert data-theft from owner’ does seem more appropriate. That’s not just with Android devices, but also Apple products that seem to know just a bit more about one than feels comfortable dealing with, yet can’t even do autocorrect accurately after three years of heavy use!

The Ruckus in JNU:
The upshot of this: young people ought to get some respect and empathy from the society in which they live, not merely be subservient to the demands of their elders or an uncaring and corrupt government. That, I think, applies well to any nation on the planet.

Nature @Kolkata in Ashwin:
A beautiful description of the local season during the month of Mahalaya and Durgapuja. It puts to shame the petty festivals in my own country, save those brought here by immigrants from across the world, and especially those hailing from the subcontinent.

Rani Rudrama Devi – Glimpses of Indian History:
A fascinating look into the reign of a strong and powerful woman in a region otherwise dominated by men. The fact that she was such an effective ruler despite attempts to obstruct her ability belies the notion that women can’t compete with men.

Story Time:
These were delightful, showing an ability with words I’ve yet to effectively master in the authoress’s domain. ‘I am still here’ stood out in particular as memorable as wonderful short fiction in which the protagonist has a friendly and life-changing encounter with a Goddess. I love that Hindu deities are so colorful and relatable, which nicely segues into…

…Durgapuja:
For which there are picturesque digital art memes describing the days in this most Bengali of festivals, an easily-grasped account of each part of the celebration in excellent detail. I recommend the book they come from.

Verses:
These are prone to evoking childhood sense-memories, far, far back to a time when I felt that everything was magic, though seeing the world now with older eyes hasn’t spoiled that so much as it may have.

Cat and Butterfly:
A collection of seven digitally painted memes, it’s a tale of my favorite species of cute but murderous pets and their victims in the eternal struggle between predators and prey.

And next, for Ashwin Agnishatdal:

Ishwar Chandra Bidyasagar: What a remarkable man, a reformer and educator who took a lot of trouble onto himself in his work of bettering the academic lot of Indian women and the poor, and arousing the anger of the establishment. That kind of courage is hard to find anymore.

Birendra Krishna Bhadra: This piece on a famous radio personality, and his remarkable career and family upbringing really stood out. It made me want to download one of his radio programs to listen to, Mahishasur Mardini.

Only Yourself: Wendel’s piece is well-put in the futility of claiming to love without really meaning it.

A little pain made it rain: Dominic has in this issue a great bit of poignant verse.

Universal love: A good call and case for love and compassion in a world that often seems more cynical and jaded than it ought to at times.

The Raja and the Swamiji: Raghunandan here relates a terrific tale of a puissant Northern ruler whose skills with a bow come in very handy in saving his life from some very foolish bandits….foolish for thinking they could best him in combat. The Raja’s travails, prior to this combat, are brought into context by the wise swamiji, and resolved by the same. Very good.

The Black Queen: This tale of a retired nobleman in Vietnam, accentuated with photos and scenes from a decorative chessboard is well-written, a good piece of period fiction.

Binding the household: Swati gives a good argument for the abolition of rigid gender roles in work, those roles set in place by skewed ideologies by most societies from childhood onward.

Aardvark reflection: This has some good points as well, on the folly of believing everything you read. It’s a theme that has all too many instances in this age of the Internet and rampant misinformation. Evaluating information reliably is often more critical than merely finding it in a book or webpage.

Impressions: Lisa here has created a delightful scene along the shoreline of a beach, with a good quote accompanying it.

Treats of D Month:
This section includes two interviews, with Hemdiva Dev, and Teagan R. Geneveine. My thanks to the eZine’s creator for the wonderful Bengali birthday shoutout. This will sound odd coming from me, but it makes me feel blessed to be so highly honored. There are here the critiques of the Bhadra issue as well.

Creator’s Quill:
Here are contributions by the creator herself, a collection of wonderful verses appropriate for the season in digital meme form, showing a good sense of balance for text and imagery combined as one. If only I could do so well with that for my own memes! Kudos! The Bangla and Hindi verse in their graceful scripts will be excellent subjects for study and practice in reading in both languages!

Narad Shrimati – A love story from the Hindu Purans:
This was touching, and interesting in that its outcome seems to me to lead up to the birth of the hero Rama, to the events in the epic Ramayana, including the origin of Rama’s nemesis, Raja Ravana.

India This Month:
There are several holidays noted here, from Durgapuja, to Muharram, to Kojagari Lakshmipuja, this section gives a good overview of celebrations taking place during the month.

Pieces of Past: Indus Valley Cities:
More information on one of my favorite early civilizations, and its legacy, most often seen in the remnants of its cities, which used means of maintaining a high population with advanced sanitation means, a sign of high culture and for its time, superior knowledge.

Whew! Another issue rich with interesting things to read, and I await the Kartik issue when it comes!

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